Best Practices For Managing Diabetes On a Truck

If you know a truck driver you know that many of them suffer from ailments. The reason that this happens is the job is a sedentary one, and one with very few options to stay healthy. Due to the lack of healthy options in truck stops and diners.

Managing Diabetes is Easy with proper tools

If you are a diabetic and a driver monitoring is key. You need to be checking your numbers and making sure that they fall in the range as discussed between you and your medical professional. I am in no way a doctor, I am only giving you what works best for me and what has helped me on the journey to manage my pre-diabetic state. I have found that checking my sugar level at least three times a day, and taking Glucotrust works.

Knowing your body is key to knowing what symptoms or factors are present when your sugar is too high or to low. I am well aware when driving and I keep all these in check with knowing what I can eat and what I can’t. I have found that if I stay away from certain foods it works better for me. I also have found a diabetic friendly menu on the truck that I will share below. Using that as a guide and taking Glucotrust works best for me.

To eat or not to eat that is the question?

What not to eat as a truck driver with diabetes is so much bigger than what you can eat. Below is a suggestion of what I found myself online that works.

  • Turkey jerky
  • Almonds
  • Fresh fruit/veggies
  • Hard-boiled eggs
  • Peanut butter crackers
  • String cheese

This list is not all inclusive by any means. But it helps guide me on what is safe and what is not as a truck driver. Let me give you an example of what I choose when I start my shift:

1. Grapes, cutie oranges.

2. Hard Boiled Eggs

3. String cheese.

I keep all these things in my reach while I am driving. I have a basket with a cooler so that it all stays fresh for me. I know that these items are not going to spike my sugar. I make sure that I pair all this with what my medical professional and I have agreed upon to keep me healthy.

What I don’t eat. I don’t do a lot of sugar on the road. Sitting in that seat all day it just makes for an uncomfortable journey. It causes more problems. Yes I realize that some of what I eat has natural sugar, however I am talking high content sugar. Like Twinkies, chips, anything in the truck stop that is usually tasty, is NOT good for you.

You know you best!

Please make sure that you are aware of what you and your medical professional have discussed. I am telling you what has worked for me. Please discuss this with your medical professional first.

If you have any questions about this please feel free to leave a comment below and I am happy to help.

Happy Trucking

Les

7 Comments

  1. This is an awesome post on the best practices for managing diabetes on a truck! My dad might have diabetes, as it runs in the family, and he’s been seeing symptoms now. Since he often drives long hours for work, I will share this article with him. He definitely needs to stop with the double-double coffees in the afternoon. What do you eat during mealtimes to manage diabetes?

    1. My husband and I both eat like toritilla wraps with lots of protein. We are big into veggies and such as snacks. Now we also splurge a bit once in a while so we don’t go into complete shock. But we also like lots of rice and beans. We usually meal prep our week with egg and ham and cheese muffins for breakfast. Then for lunch we usually take like rice and pork or rice and turkey. Because it is grab and go we try to make things that don’t require us to stop often to use the microwave. Does that help?

  2. Hey Les, thank you for writing this – I feel like, sure you’re no doctor but you are the one living with it, and we need to hear more from those actually experiencing it on the ground. I was on diabetes medication for about a decade, and sure medication helps, but I think a very crucial aspect of the care process with diabetes is to know your own body and figure out a game plan to eat the right kind of food! Thanks, again.

  3. Hi Les,

    Thank you for your article. Excellent information. I am not a truck driver but have a lot of friends who are. I am on the road a lot and the amount of trucks is unbelievable. I would like to thank all the truck drivers out there for what they do. I believe we all take you for granted. If it wasn’t for the trucker, where would we be?

    Your recommendation of “what you eat” is much appreciated. It looks as if the Glucotrust is an excellent product to help keep your sugar level down. It is much better to be a pre-diabetic than a diabetic.

    Is this something you take 1 time daily or with every meal?

    Again, thank you, and blessings to you and all the truckers out there.

    Mike

    1. Thank you for your sweet reply!! I take it once a day and usually at bedtime is what works best for me. Whomever else takes it needs to follow the directions on the bottle for best usage, also should speak to their medical professional FIRST. Just throwing that out there!! 

      I love what I do and it runs in my veins, I love that I am part of this industry and what it does for our country!! I hope you have a fantastic day!

  4. Hey, I think it is so necessary to be careful of our health and especially our diabetes. It may be cause of to many disease and problems in body. As I was reading your post I realized that how much you care a bout this issue, I totally appreciate what you are doing. I think the product (GLUCOTRUST) you shared is a great one, but if you ask me I will use it or not, I will say that before using this product I surely have to consult to a doctor.

  5. Managing your diabetes or pre-diabetes is critical when driving a truck. If you are a diabetic, in some states, you may have to be given a physical more than once per year. This is to make sure that you are keeping your diabetes under control. 

    I have found another item that helps keep your blood sugar under control. This is a drink called Glucodown, you can purchase it on Amazon. There are a variety of flavors available. With monitoring, eating healthy and taking the supplements you described, you can achieve your goals. My blood sugar went from 225 to 115 in just a couple of months. This would certainly be beneficial if I were still driving a truck.

    Jerry

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *